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James Benn and the Hay Makers - Makin' Hay

James Benn and the Hay Makers - Makin' Hay
Product Code: CD-1090
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Half singing, half speaking, Benn's voice matches the beautiful and understated arrangements. The occasional addition of cello and clarinet lends a nice variation to the moods


  *****AUTOGRAPHED COPY*****  

 

Track Listing
1. In My Time 
2. Love Fever 
3. Troubles On My Mind 
4. What's Another Day 
5. Rosemary 
6. I Fell In Love With You 
7. You Are
8. Always Coming Back 
9. When Nicoletta Smiles
10. Woman I Love
11. Long Weekend 
Click on above buttons to hear samples of select tracks

 


 

   More info 

 Hot on the heels of Early Risin’, Sydney-based songwriter, James Benn releases another 11-song set of original tunes, Makin' Hay. Actually, not quite hot on the heels. And not quite original tunes. One of them is actually a re-interpretation of Luigi Tenco's 'Mi sono inamorato di te', a famous Italian torch song of the ‘60s. James believes it to be the first version ever sung in English.

 Again in search of a press release, James turns to his old mate Ray Rose for assistance. Ray generously responds … "Well if I had to write something, this is what I'd say": "James Benn shares a sombre sensibility with The Haymakers. Half singing, half speaking, Benn's voice matches the beautiful and understated arrangements. The occasional addition of cello and clarinet lends a nice variation to the moods.

 

Not every track works. If the same ‘Nicoletta’ who smiles on Track 9 is also the 'Woman I Love' on Track 10, then she should be proud to feature on the two standout tracks. But ‘Rosemary’ might be less pleased to be named on Track 3. Overall this is an interesting and beautifully arranged album.

James wisely never tries to assert authority over his band but just adds his voice as another instrument. Perhaps that’s because he and bassist Jorge Pereira were responsible for all arrangements and they are clearly a genuine talent.

 

The sun should shine long enough for the Haymakers to make other albums.” “Why’d you reckon Rosemary might be less pleased?” “Too long. Too wordy.” “Best song on the platter as far as I’m concerned.” “Why the Haymakers? What happened to the Early Risers?” “Well that was then. This is now. But in fact, some of the same players appear. Jorge, my old mate and collaborator, on bass. Craig Walters on sax and clarinet. Gotta be one of the sweetest sounds in Sydney. And Anatoli Torjinski on cello and occasional piano. Rodrigo Galvao again on drums. What a player.

New to the Haymaker sessions were Yanya Boston on percussion and Marcello Maio on keyboards. Both terrific players and well known on the Sydney circuit.” “Tell me, what was that last track all about? Not sure it works. Why so different?” “Forgot to mention, it’s an adaptation of a John Shaw Neilson poem. Wrote it when I was about 17. For some reason, it always stuck in my head.”

 

“Why’d you call it ‘Makin’ Hay’? It’s not exactly country and western.” “Well, there’s a time, and place, for everything, you know.” James Benn 2010

 


 

 You can e-mail James'  at jamesbenn@tpg.com.au

 


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Description

Half singing, half speaking, Benn's voice matches the beautiful and understated arrangements. The occasional addition of cello and clarinet lends a nice variation to the moods


  *****AUTOGRAPHED COPY*****  

 

Track Listing
1. In My Time 
2. Love Fever 
3. Troubles On My Mind 
4. What's Another Day 
5. Rosemary 
6. I Fell In Love With You 
7. You Are
8. Always Coming Back 
9. When Nicoletta Smiles
10. Woman I Love
11. Long Weekend 
Click on above buttons to hear samples of select tracks

 


 

   More info 

 Hot on the heels of Early Risin’, Sydney-based songwriter, James Benn releases another 11-song set of original tunes, Makin' Hay. Actually, not quite hot on the heels. And not quite original tunes. One of them is actually a re-interpretation of Luigi Tenco's 'Mi sono inamorato di te', a famous Italian torch song of the ‘60s. James believes it to be the first version ever sung in English.

 Again in search of a press release, James turns to his old mate Ray Rose for assistance. Ray generously responds … "Well if I had to write something, this is what I'd say": "James Benn shares a sombre sensibility with The Haymakers. Half singing, half speaking, Benn's voice matches the beautiful and understated arrangements. The occasional addition of cello and clarinet lends a nice variation to the moods.

 

Not every track works. If the same ‘Nicoletta’ who smiles on Track 9 is also the 'Woman I Love' on Track 10, then she should be proud to feature on the two standout tracks. But ‘Rosemary’ might be less pleased to be named on Track 3. Overall this is an interesting and beautifully arranged album.

James wisely never tries to assert authority over his band but just adds his voice as another instrument. Perhaps that’s because he and bassist Jorge Pereira were responsible for all arrangements and they are clearly a genuine talent.

 

The sun should shine long enough for the Haymakers to make other albums.” “Why’d you reckon Rosemary might be less pleased?” “Too long. Too wordy.” “Best song on the platter as far as I’m concerned.” “Why the Haymakers? What happened to the Early Risers?” “Well that was then. This is now. But in fact, some of the same players appear. Jorge, my old mate and collaborator, on bass. Craig Walters on sax and clarinet. Gotta be one of the sweetest sounds in Sydney. And Anatoli Torjinski on cello and occasional piano. Rodrigo Galvao again on drums. What a player.

New to the Haymaker sessions were Yanya Boston on percussion and Marcello Maio on keyboards. Both terrific players and well known on the Sydney circuit.” “Tell me, what was that last track all about? Not sure it works. Why so different?” “Forgot to mention, it’s an adaptation of a John Shaw Neilson poem. Wrote it when I was about 17. For some reason, it always stuck in my head.”

 

“Why’d you call it ‘Makin’ Hay’? It’s not exactly country and western.” “Well, there’s a time, and place, for everything, you know.” James Benn 2010

 


 

 You can e-mail James'  at jamesbenn@tpg.com.au

 


Write a review

Your Name:


Your Review: Note: HTML is not translated!

Rating: Bad           Good

Enter the code in the box below: