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Blatherskite - Where The Wasteland Ends

Blatherskite - Where The Wasteland Ends
Product Code: CD-1028
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A dirty blend of industrial rock and metal, punctuated with tongue-in-cheek self depreciation


  *****AUTOGRAPHED COPY*****   

 

Track Listing
1. Majestic 
2.The Other 
3. Third Day Fear 
4. Dogs 
5. FYC
6. Icarus  
7. Serpent Hive
8. Money To Burn 
9. Complication
10. ...And You Thought You'd Die Alone
Click on above buttons to hear samples of select tracks

 

 


  More info & Reviews 

 "It recently occurred to me that I'm yet to give a positive review of an album on this site. This is my own fault in part, due to me reviewing whatever needs to be reviewed rather than just albums from bands I'm familiar with. Some would say it's also my own fault for having high standards, but I'd rather say it's the fault of most metal for being shit. I am pleased to announce, however, that I've finally got a good one.

 Blatherskite's Where the Wasteland Ends is one of the best new albums I've heard from an Australian band in years, being the debut effort of a group of Sydney lads who clearly have an affinity for the kind of metal which doesn't punch you right in the throat, but rather has a steady build, crushing you with their sheer weight. One adjective I don't hear applied to riffs very often, but which I quite like, is 'swimming', because the mental image of a guitar line flowing along on anything from calm waters to violent waves is one which suits a number of bands quite well. It isn't really applicable to the nautically-themed bands you'd expect it to be (Gojira, Ahab and of course Mastodon), and if you asked me where you could hear an ideal example of such riffs I would direct you toward post-metal gods Isis, most specifically their recent Wavering Radiant record.

But I could also point you toward Blatherskite. Blatherskite are post-metal in that fantastic, difficult-to-pull-off way. The riffs wash over you (there's that aquatic metaphor again) and give the sense that you're being covered in the music, but never overwhelmed - though they are a bit more straightforward and less dreamy or ambient than your average post-metal band. The lyrics are a bit silly and that's not helped by the vocalist sounding a little like the tool from Tool, but that vocal style fits well with the music and makes an interesting change from the moans or subdued roars of most post-metal bands. The drummer in particular stands out as someone who's not afraid to dick around with the rythyms to make the music more interesting, but never tries to show off or get in the way of everyone else.

The band have also done quite a good job with the packaging (especially considering it's just a booklet in a jewel case rather than the increasingly common digipacks), including an incomprehensible but rather cool little comic which I'm still trying to figure out the relevance or lack thereof to the lyrics or theme of the album. I'm probably getting a bit more excited about this band than I ought to, given the generally mediocre-to-shit state of the albums I've reviewed in the past few months.

But I think I can accurately say that if you're into post-metal, or if you want to hear a talented, new, unsigned Australian metal band worth supporting, you could do a hell of a lot worse than Blatherskite." - Simon Burnett, MetalasFuck.net

VOLTAGE MEDIA - with the inimitable Anna!  I recently caught up with guitarist Tim Kyoko LimSands and vocalist Nick Goryl of Sydney’s alt. prog metal outfit BLATHERSKITE. With a moniker defining the foolish and nonsensical, their music is certainly not. What is the background of the band, how and when did it start? TIM; Blatherskite began in high school, 1995 with Brendan Davie. It began because we hated most of the music we heard and wanted to make music we could listen to. Obviously we have no ego issues whatsoever. How long has Blatherskite been around and how have you changed? TIM; Well, Blatherskite has pretty much been around for 15 years of my life, but I'm the only original member left, and we've only reached our perfect lineup in the past year. When we began we were writing badly played Mr. Bungle/Korn Circus metal rip-offs. Yes, it was every bit as bad as it sounded, but we were 15 at the time, and had been together for six months. There were a few years after high school of engaging in Very Bad Things which led to the band being in hiatus for a year, before returning in 2000 with a new vocalist, Nick Goryl. During this time there was lots of music written, and completely forgotten about. In 2005, we reached a boiling point with our bassist, and he left the band due to Very Bad Things. There were many years of hardcore practicing, and then my father died which meant I had to take over a bookstore for a while in 2006 which put another slight hiatus on the band. In 2008 we began recording for "Where the Wasteland Ends" with Dave Hammer, and he really helped shape our sound to the rampaging, sexy behemoth that it is now. (We hope).Timothy Lamont (Morbid Sheep) helped develop the visual side of Blatherskite over the year, and now we have created a really messed up parallel world for people to interact with. After we finished recording the album, Brendan Davie, the other original member of the band announced that he was leaving to spawn a child, which he did, to great applause. Stewart Horsfield (our guitarist up to this time) also left to pursue his education. There were a few months spent searching for perfect replacement band members, which we found in Louis Rosin(Intrigage, drummer), Luka Szczepanik (Promontory, bassist) and Matt Newton (Guitars). Blatherskite is now stronger than ever, and with a unified sound and vision we hope to infect you all with our darkened dreams, and perhaps a touch of syphilis. What were you doing musically before Blatherskite? TIM; Screaming as loud as I could, wherever I could, beating off, piano.

Your bio states that this is your fourth album, how has your sound changed with this record, and where can one get their hands on the other albums? TIM; We also recorded the first album of our new sound, ‘Three Worlds’ in our home studio, and self released it in 2005. It was vaguely unsatisfying to me, and we spent the next 4 years writing stronger material which would reflect the band's progression from kiddy circus screamo to a more matured and confident sound. The albums before that were pretty bad, very bad Mr. Bungle/Korn... if you can imagine it. Anyway, this album's production is the best we've ever had, thanks to the almighty Dave Hammer and 2 years of pre production, 1 year of recording and mixing. Insults and derision also helped. We tried to find that fine balance between punching someone in the face directly, and biding our time till the revenge was served cold. In short, first our songs were chaos, and then with ‘Three Worlds’ it took a very very long time to say anything. We've hopefully reached a middle ground with the album, where some of the tracks come out fists flailing, whereas there are some very nice atmospheric buildups on the tracks. We had a bit of a narrative in mind with the album, we've always been into narrative structures in songs, and we're getting more proficient at building it into our songs and albums coherently. You can never get your hands on the other albums, maybe ‘Three Worlds’ if you go towww.bigwoolly.com/blatherskite depending how needy I feel for money. The first album was on CASSETTE. Woot!

How fond are you of your old records? TIM; How fond are you of your old faces? [Ed. Touché] Admittedly there are some recognizable bits that might have been good to start with, but having come out the other end, well, there's not much to see there. Of course, I have been known to be exceedingly harsh on everything. ‘Three Worlds’ had some nice riffs on it, but as I say, it took a while to get anywhere. What has been the biggest inspiration on the latest album? TIM; Finding something to believe in, in a world of shit, exploring every emotion, negative and positive, REALLY REALLY BIG BALLS. How was the recording process, and you who did you get to work with [apart from the band] in creating this record? TIM; Well, we actually had some contact with Sylvia Massy, Producer/Engineer from the US, she's worked on many an epic. What has been the reaction to ‘Where the Wasteland Ends’? TIM; People seem to have this impression that we're going to be total Death Metal, or just noise, but nothing could really be further from the truth. I think the best comment I had was "It speaks to me at a universal level.” Of course, that was from my brother in law after I'd just helped him move his bed to a new house, but you can take that how you will.

What is your favorite track off the new album and why? TIM; At the moment, probably “Complication”, because it's the best story we've told so far I think, probably the most abstract and epic of our songs. “Dogs” is the most fun to play; it always feels like we're twenty feet tall when we play it! Hopefully, you will too. NICK; I’m really proud of the new album – of the songs individually and the album as a whole listening experience. It’s hard to pinpoint a favourite but I’d say “Icarus” personally – I think it has an organic yet unpredictable progression with moments of darkness, ambience and power. It deals with an intense experience which was very cathartic to write about. What is the biggest influence on the lyrical content? TIM; Telling stories, getting behind your filters, getting inside your rooms. NICK; The content can come from anywhere, whether it’s a personal experience, or an observation of the internal or external. There aren’t really any rules around subject matter – except I doubt we’ll ever write a song about girls wearing short skirts in nightclubs. It’s more about having an idea that’s song-worthy and expressing it effectively, hopefully allowing people to make their own connections while leaving some space for interpretation.

Is there one in particular who composes the music, or is it a collaborative effort; and furthermore what are the underlying emotions and mindsets you get in to whilst writing? TIM; On ‘Where the Wasteland Ends’, the music was mainly composed by Brendan Davieand myself, and Nick wrote most of the vocals, and we worked together on the lyrics. We go back and forth, with the new members there are whole new avenues of expressions opening up, which is quite exciting for me. My favourite method of writing is multi layered, write a riff, jam it, cut together other jams, write some more, it's quite organic. We play around ‘till a contextual theme arises from the music, and then we make a story out of it. When I write, I know it's right when it feels like the music is lifting the top of my skull off my head. What message is Blatherskite sending, the lyrics seem to definitely delve in the mind and emotive stance of a personal nature? TIM; We really try to evoke a sense of passionate wonder, or outrage, basically extremes of emotions, pleasurable, uncomfortable, dark and light. There's really not enough of this going on anymore, we are so sterilized in our lives, and so bound by invisible chains that I think quite a bit of chaos might be needed to give us a return to our souls. Maybe we're past the point of peaceful redemption, maybe all that's left is an apocalypse, maybe one that destroys, maybe one that creates. It's all about considering everything, real or not. I guess to sum it up, "Nothing in this Book is True, But it's How Things Are". (Bob Frissell) NICK; Ahh... any message or agenda can emanate from the soapbox of blather! Inner workings are definitely interesting to explore. I guess psychology is about as universal as it gets, so it seems to me an appropriate artistic subject. It’s not always necessarily personal though. Sometimes you might write a lyric in the first person for example, but it may be in order to adopt a character rather than speak subjectively or personally.

You’re currently touring in support of the record, how have you found your time thus far? TIM; It is definitely a long hard frickin' road if you wanna rock and roll. We've hit any number of snags in the path, but I have to say there are bands and people out there that definitely make it worthwhile. We've been touring consistently with Red Bee, another fucking amazing and underrated band and we recently hit QLD with Overfiend and Weaponhead, who were awesome as well, and really great guys. There's a lot of camaraderie in the traps, if you know where to look, but there's also a lot of bullshit... However, the glass is 1/3 full.

There aren’t many bands that explore the sound that Blatherskite possesses; playing along side bands of a different subgenre with their fans watching - what has been the reaction from the live audience? TIM; It's incredibly satisfying and uplifting seeing an entire room of people captivated by the music, and then giving back the same energy with contemporaries you respect and rock out with! We've found the audiences really receptive when we've hit the right mix of bands; I received a lot of fabulous compliments, where it feels like we've really managed to convey this world across to them. We find that because we're such an individual band, we tend to attract like-minded individual bands, that is to say our music may come across differently, but the most rewarding lineups have been where all the bands are pushing the envelope, be it through performance, song writing or incredibly live sounds. And I think that's so important, to get an awesome lineup of bands happening, because too often promoters seem to throw together completely incompatible bands together, creating a mish mash kind of gig. We like to get our hands in, meet everyone, and pour beer on people. What are your personal and the band’s inspirations; be it music, art, literature, history etc? TIM; Much music. We've always admired bands that can experiment, but it always has to be driven with passion, otherwise I kind of just lose interest. I'm quite an emotional person (perhaps to my own detriment at times), and I love music that takes me away and allows me to experience those extremes. I've always wanted to find a different way of doing things; I've always thought someone needed to stand up for different ways, just to shake things up. I'm a spiritual anarchist. I love words and wordsmiths, William S Burroughs and TS Elliot are two favorites, I read a lot, I listen to a lot, I look at everything and I try to see it through new eyes, again and again. It's hard, and really easy to get tired and disillusioned with everything, but to me it's the process of overcoming living. Also, ‘Where the Wasteland Ends’ is actually a book written in the 70's by a Russian Philosopher, Theodore Roszack, and it is filled with a passionate, prophetic intensity. Great stuff.

How are you finding the state of the world – is there a political concern within the band? TIM; I find it quite abhorrent; we are in a spiritual void. Superficial moral grandstanding with financial profits, everything is tainted, so do we accept it and skim over it or is it a rotting from within? We don't question nearly enough, and yet accept too much. Is that really the way it's going to be? NICK; I don’t really like it when politics overtly infiltrates art, but I think that’s less to do with what is expressed than how it is expressed. The state of the world...it’s funny…for all the changes and advancements we’ve seen throughout history, some elements that are older than civilization remain firmly entrenched. No matter what flavour of herding humanity is dominant – whether it’s a monarchy, a religious state, a dictatorship, a democracy, communism, fascism or capitalism – as different from each other as they may claim to be, they share one invariable truth - that a tiny minority is materially far superior to the majority, and that material elitism necessarily relies on the hard and undervalued work of these meeker masses. Most of the elite and the meek are essentially born that way (though a select few of the meek are able to use some ability to create elite status). I think this age-old inequality, established at birth, is at the core of most of humanity’s ills and until genuine principles of universal equality and love underpin our activities, I can’t see those ills being remedied. I’m no hippie and I’m not saying there shouldn’t be some who have more than others – there always will be, and that’s fine – some people work harder than others – but when a few people generate more wealth in a week than they could possibly need in a lifetime, and many people don’t make enough to meet the most basic needs, well, that makes me ashamed to be human.

What are some books that you have read that have profoundly influenced your thinking and/or your music? TIM; Prometheus Rising - Robert Anton Wilson, Four Quarters - TS Elliot, Naked Lunch - William S Burroughs, The Elegant Universe - Brian Greene, Takeshi Kovacs Series - Richard Morgan, Use of Weapons - Iain M Banks, Where the Wasteland Ends - Theodore Roszack


 

 You can visit their website or e-mail them at blatherskite.saves@gmail.com


 

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Your Review: Note: HTML is not translated!

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Description

A dirty blend of industrial rock and metal, punctuated with tongue-in-cheek self depreciation


  *****AUTOGRAPHED COPY*****   

 

Track Listing
1. Majestic 
2.The Other 
3. Third Day Fear 
4. Dogs 
5. FYC
6. Icarus  
7. Serpent Hive
8. Money To Burn 
9. Complication
10. ...And You Thought You'd Die Alone
Click on above buttons to hear samples of select tracks

 

 


  More info & Reviews 

 "It recently occurred to me that I'm yet to give a positive review of an album on this site. This is my own fault in part, due to me reviewing whatever needs to be reviewed rather than just albums from bands I'm familiar with. Some would say it's also my own fault for having high standards, but I'd rather say it's the fault of most metal for being shit. I am pleased to announce, however, that I've finally got a good one.

 Blatherskite's Where the Wasteland Ends is one of the best new albums I've heard from an Australian band in years, being the debut effort of a group of Sydney lads who clearly have an affinity for the kind of metal which doesn't punch you right in the throat, but rather has a steady build, crushing you with their sheer weight. One adjective I don't hear applied to riffs very often, but which I quite like, is 'swimming', because the mental image of a guitar line flowing along on anything from calm waters to violent waves is one which suits a number of bands quite well. It isn't really applicable to the nautically-themed bands you'd expect it to be (Gojira, Ahab and of course Mastodon), and if you asked me where you could hear an ideal example of such riffs I would direct you toward post-metal gods Isis, most specifically their recent Wavering Radiant record.

But I could also point you toward Blatherskite. Blatherskite are post-metal in that fantastic, difficult-to-pull-off way. The riffs wash over you (there's that aquatic metaphor again) and give the sense that you're being covered in the music, but never overwhelmed - though they are a bit more straightforward and less dreamy or ambient than your average post-metal band. The lyrics are a bit silly and that's not helped by the vocalist sounding a little like the tool from Tool, but that vocal style fits well with the music and makes an interesting change from the moans or subdued roars of most post-metal bands. The drummer in particular stands out as someone who's not afraid to dick around with the rythyms to make the music more interesting, but never tries to show off or get in the way of everyone else.

The band have also done quite a good job with the packaging (especially considering it's just a booklet in a jewel case rather than the increasingly common digipacks), including an incomprehensible but rather cool little comic which I'm still trying to figure out the relevance or lack thereof to the lyrics or theme of the album. I'm probably getting a bit more excited about this band than I ought to, given the generally mediocre-to-shit state of the albums I've reviewed in the past few months.

But I think I can accurately say that if you're into post-metal, or if you want to hear a talented, new, unsigned Australian metal band worth supporting, you could do a hell of a lot worse than Blatherskite." - Simon Burnett, MetalasFuck.net

VOLTAGE MEDIA - with the inimitable Anna!  I recently caught up with guitarist Tim Kyoko LimSands and vocalist Nick Goryl of Sydney’s alt. prog metal outfit BLATHERSKITE. With a moniker defining the foolish and nonsensical, their music is certainly not. What is the background of the band, how and when did it start? TIM; Blatherskite began in high school, 1995 with Brendan Davie. It began because we hated most of the music we heard and wanted to make music we could listen to. Obviously we have no ego issues whatsoever. How long has Blatherskite been around and how have you changed? TIM; Well, Blatherskite has pretty much been around for 15 years of my life, but I'm the only original member left, and we've only reached our perfect lineup in the past year. When we began we were writing badly played Mr. Bungle/Korn Circus metal rip-offs. Yes, it was every bit as bad as it sounded, but we were 15 at the time, and had been together for six months. There were a few years after high school of engaging in Very Bad Things which led to the band being in hiatus for a year, before returning in 2000 with a new vocalist, Nick Goryl. During this time there was lots of music written, and completely forgotten about. In 2005, we reached a boiling point with our bassist, and he left the band due to Very Bad Things. There were many years of hardcore practicing, and then my father died which meant I had to take over a bookstore for a while in 2006 which put another slight hiatus on the band. In 2008 we began recording for "Where the Wasteland Ends" with Dave Hammer, and he really helped shape our sound to the rampaging, sexy behemoth that it is now. (We hope).Timothy Lamont (Morbid Sheep) helped develop the visual side of Blatherskite over the year, and now we have created a really messed up parallel world for people to interact with. After we finished recording the album, Brendan Davie, the other original member of the band announced that he was leaving to spawn a child, which he did, to great applause. Stewart Horsfield (our guitarist up to this time) also left to pursue his education. There were a few months spent searching for perfect replacement band members, which we found in Louis Rosin(Intrigage, drummer), Luka Szczepanik (Promontory, bassist) and Matt Newton (Guitars). Blatherskite is now stronger than ever, and with a unified sound and vision we hope to infect you all with our darkened dreams, and perhaps a touch of syphilis. What were you doing musically before Blatherskite? TIM; Screaming as loud as I could, wherever I could, beating off, piano.

Your bio states that this is your fourth album, how has your sound changed with this record, and where can one get their hands on the other albums? TIM; We also recorded the first album of our new sound, ‘Three Worlds’ in our home studio, and self released it in 2005. It was vaguely unsatisfying to me, and we spent the next 4 years writing stronger material which would reflect the band's progression from kiddy circus screamo to a more matured and confident sound. The albums before that were pretty bad, very bad Mr. Bungle/Korn... if you can imagine it. Anyway, this album's production is the best we've ever had, thanks to the almighty Dave Hammer and 2 years of pre production, 1 year of recording and mixing. Insults and derision also helped. We tried to find that fine balance between punching someone in the face directly, and biding our time till the revenge was served cold. In short, first our songs were chaos, and then with ‘Three Worlds’ it took a very very long time to say anything. We've hopefully reached a middle ground with the album, where some of the tracks come out fists flailing, whereas there are some very nice atmospheric buildups on the tracks. We had a bit of a narrative in mind with the album, we've always been into narrative structures in songs, and we're getting more proficient at building it into our songs and albums coherently. You can never get your hands on the other albums, maybe ‘Three Worlds’ if you go towww.bigwoolly.com/blatherskite depending how needy I feel for money. The first album was on CASSETTE. Woot!

How fond are you of your old records? TIM; How fond are you of your old faces? [Ed. Touché] Admittedly there are some recognizable bits that might have been good to start with, but having come out the other end, well, there's not much to see there. Of course, I have been known to be exceedingly harsh on everything. ‘Three Worlds’ had some nice riffs on it, but as I say, it took a while to get anywhere. What has been the biggest inspiration on the latest album? TIM; Finding something to believe in, in a world of shit, exploring every emotion, negative and positive, REALLY REALLY BIG BALLS. How was the recording process, and you who did you get to work with [apart from the band] in creating this record? TIM; Well, we actually had some contact with Sylvia Massy, Producer/Engineer from the US, she's worked on many an epic. What has been the reaction to ‘Where the Wasteland Ends’? TIM; People seem to have this impression that we're going to be total Death Metal, or just noise, but nothing could really be further from the truth. I think the best comment I had was "It speaks to me at a universal level.” Of course, that was from my brother in law after I'd just helped him move his bed to a new house, but you can take that how you will.

What is your favorite track off the new album and why? TIM; At the moment, probably “Complication”, because it's the best story we've told so far I think, probably the most abstract and epic of our songs. “Dogs” is the most fun to play; it always feels like we're twenty feet tall when we play it! Hopefully, you will too. NICK; I’m really proud of the new album – of the songs individually and the album as a whole listening experience. It’s hard to pinpoint a favourite but I’d say “Icarus” personally – I think it has an organic yet unpredictable progression with moments of darkness, ambience and power. It deals with an intense experience which was very cathartic to write about. What is the biggest influence on the lyrical content? TIM; Telling stories, getting behind your filters, getting inside your rooms. NICK; The content can come from anywhere, whether it’s a personal experience, or an observation of the internal or external. There aren’t really any rules around subject matter – except I doubt we’ll ever write a song about girls wearing short skirts in nightclubs. It’s more about having an idea that’s song-worthy and expressing it effectively, hopefully allowing people to make their own connections while leaving some space for interpretation.

Is there one in particular who composes the music, or is it a collaborative effort; and furthermore what are the underlying emotions and mindsets you get in to whilst writing? TIM; On ‘Where the Wasteland Ends’, the music was mainly composed by Brendan Davieand myself, and Nick wrote most of the vocals, and we worked together on the lyrics. We go back and forth, with the new members there are whole new avenues of expressions opening up, which is quite exciting for me. My favourite method of writing is multi layered, write a riff, jam it, cut together other jams, write some more, it's quite organic. We play around ‘till a contextual theme arises from the music, and then we make a story out of it. When I write, I know it's right when it feels like the music is lifting the top of my skull off my head. What message is Blatherskite sending, the lyrics seem to definitely delve in the mind and emotive stance of a personal nature? TIM; We really try to evoke a sense of passionate wonder, or outrage, basically extremes of emotions, pleasurable, uncomfortable, dark and light. There's really not enough of this going on anymore, we are so sterilized in our lives, and so bound by invisible chains that I think quite a bit of chaos might be needed to give us a return to our souls. Maybe we're past the point of peaceful redemption, maybe all that's left is an apocalypse, maybe one that destroys, maybe one that creates. It's all about considering everything, real or not. I guess to sum it up, "Nothing in this Book is True, But it's How Things Are". (Bob Frissell) NICK; Ahh... any message or agenda can emanate from the soapbox of blather! Inner workings are definitely interesting to explore. I guess psychology is about as universal as it gets, so it seems to me an appropriate artistic subject. It’s not always necessarily personal though. Sometimes you might write a lyric in the first person for example, but it may be in order to adopt a character rather than speak subjectively or personally.

You’re currently touring in support of the record, how have you found your time thus far? TIM; It is definitely a long hard frickin' road if you wanna rock and roll. We've hit any number of snags in the path, but I have to say there are bands and people out there that definitely make it worthwhile. We've been touring consistently with Red Bee, another fucking amazing and underrated band and we recently hit QLD with Overfiend and Weaponhead, who were awesome as well, and really great guys. There's a lot of camaraderie in the traps, if you know where to look, but there's also a lot of bullshit... However, the glass is 1/3 full.

There aren’t many bands that explore the sound that Blatherskite possesses; playing along side bands of a different subgenre with their fans watching - what has been the reaction from the live audience? TIM; It's incredibly satisfying and uplifting seeing an entire room of people captivated by the music, and then giving back the same energy with contemporaries you respect and rock out with! We've found the audiences really receptive when we've hit the right mix of bands; I received a lot of fabulous compliments, where it feels like we've really managed to convey this world across to them. We find that because we're such an individual band, we tend to attract like-minded individual bands, that is to say our music may come across differently, but the most rewarding lineups have been where all the bands are pushing the envelope, be it through performance, song writing or incredibly live sounds. And I think that's so important, to get an awesome lineup of bands happening, because too often promoters seem to throw together completely incompatible bands together, creating a mish mash kind of gig. We like to get our hands in, meet everyone, and pour beer on people. What are your personal and the band’s inspirations; be it music, art, literature, history etc? TIM; Much music. We've always admired bands that can experiment, but it always has to be driven with passion, otherwise I kind of just lose interest. I'm quite an emotional person (perhaps to my own detriment at times), and I love music that takes me away and allows me to experience those extremes. I've always wanted to find a different way of doing things; I've always thought someone needed to stand up for different ways, just to shake things up. I'm a spiritual anarchist. I love words and wordsmiths, William S Burroughs and TS Elliot are two favorites, I read a lot, I listen to a lot, I look at everything and I try to see it through new eyes, again and again. It's hard, and really easy to get tired and disillusioned with everything, but to me it's the process of overcoming living. Also, ‘Where the Wasteland Ends’ is actually a book written in the 70's by a Russian Philosopher, Theodore Roszack, and it is filled with a passionate, prophetic intensity. Great stuff.

How are you finding the state of the world – is there a political concern within the band? TIM; I find it quite abhorrent; we are in a spiritual void. Superficial moral grandstanding with financial profits, everything is tainted, so do we accept it and skim over it or is it a rotting from within? We don't question nearly enough, and yet accept too much. Is that really the way it's going to be? NICK; I don’t really like it when politics overtly infiltrates art, but I think that’s less to do with what is expressed than how it is expressed. The state of the world...it’s funny…for all the changes and advancements we’ve seen throughout history, some elements that are older than civilization remain firmly entrenched. No matter what flavour of herding humanity is dominant – whether it’s a monarchy, a religious state, a dictatorship, a democracy, communism, fascism or capitalism – as different from each other as they may claim to be, they share one invariable truth - that a tiny minority is materially far superior to the majority, and that material elitism necessarily relies on the hard and undervalued work of these meeker masses. Most of the elite and the meek are essentially born that way (though a select few of the meek are able to use some ability to create elite status). I think this age-old inequality, established at birth, is at the core of most of humanity’s ills and until genuine principles of universal equality and love underpin our activities, I can’t see those ills being remedied. I’m no hippie and I’m not saying there shouldn’t be some who have more than others – there always will be, and that’s fine – some people work harder than others – but when a few people generate more wealth in a week than they could possibly need in a lifetime, and many people don’t make enough to meet the most basic needs, well, that makes me ashamed to be human.

What are some books that you have read that have profoundly influenced your thinking and/or your music? TIM; Prometheus Rising - Robert Anton Wilson, Four Quarters - TS Elliot, Naked Lunch - William S Burroughs, The Elegant Universe - Brian Greene, Takeshi Kovacs Series - Richard Morgan, Use of Weapons - Iain M Banks, Where the Wasteland Ends - Theodore Roszack


 

 You can visit their website or e-mail them at blatherskite.saves@gmail.com


 

Write a review

Your Name:


Your Review: Note: HTML is not translated!

Rating: Bad           Good

Enter the code in the box below: